PNW Guns Forum
Go Back   PNW Guns > Gun Forum > Auto Rifles

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 01-08-2013, 10:44 AM   #1
Moderator
 
sunofnun's Avatar
 
Joined: Jan 2009
From: s. greenlake bitch
Posts: 1,683
Here's a fresh topic Brass vs Steel .223 / 5.56

Saw this write up and wanted to see what you guys have experienced


LINK --> http://www.luckygunner.com/labs/bras...el-cased-ammo/





The quote here is JUST the intro.. it's a pretty big writeup..


Quote:
Originally Posted by sunofnun View Post
There are two major types of centerfire rifle cartridges available on the market today:

Those which are loaded with steel, and
Those which are loaded with brass
This seemingly simple variation has caused a never ending stream of argument, discussion, speculation, and questioning from new and seasoned shooters alike. Complicating the conversation are other variables that typically get lumped into the argument without proper segmentation, such as:

The different coating options available on the steel-cased ammo (lacquer or polymer)
The different projectile loadings available (copper jacketed lead, the bi-metal coating that most Russian manufacturers use, etc)
The different propellant (gunpowder) burn rates
Our team decided to try something ambitious and daunting: to provide the best resource and data available to answer these questions once and for all through objective experimentation and observation.

We realize this is a lofty and borderline arrogant goal. We’ve done our best. Please keep reading to see if you agree.

Here’s what we did:

We acquired four identical Bushmaster AR-15 rifles. We chose the Bushmaster MOE Series AR-15 because it’s a widely available, affordable, and mass-market. We didn’t want something too cheap and of lower quality or something too expensive and of high quality since our goal is to help the most number of people.
We acquired 10,000 rounds each of the following ammunition (new production):
Federal 55gr – Brass-Cased – Copper Jacket
Wolf 55gr FMJ – Steel-Cased with Polymer Coating – Bi-Metal Jacket (steel and copper)
Tula 55gr FMJ – Steel-Cased with Polymer Coating – Bi-Metal Jacket (steel and copper)
Brown Bear 55gr FMJ – Steel-Cased with Lacquer Coating – Bi-Metal Jacket (steel and copper)
We paired each ammunition type with a specific Bushmaster AR-15 and then fired all 10,000 rounds of it through that particular carbine (except for Tula; more on that below)
We systematically observed and tested various things, including (more details below):
At the start: accuracy, velocity, chamber and gas port pressures, chamber cast
After 2,000 rounds: accuracy, velocity
After 4,000 rounds: accuracy, velocity
After 5,000 rounds: throat erosion, chamber cast
After 6,000 rounds: accuracy, velocity
After 8,000 rounds: accuracy, velocity
After 10,000 rounds: accuracy, velocity, chamber and gas port pressures, throat erosion, extractor wear, chamber cast, barrel wear
We logged every malfunction of every rifle-ammo combination
The rifles were cleaned according to a preset schedule and temperatures were monitored and kept within acceptable limits (more below)
We sectioned the barrels and otherwise made unique observations after the test was complete
If you’re interested in any of the following, you’ll find observations, data, and further details below:

Which ammunition was most reliable?
Which ammunition was the dirtiest?
Which performed better, lacquer or polymer coating?
Which ammunition maintained the highest degree of accuracy throughout the test?
Which ammunition maintained the most consistent velocity throughout the test?
Which ammunition caused the most throat, barrel, and extractor erosion/wear?
What effect did the powder burn rates have on bolt cycling?
How did the pressure at the gas port vary by ammunition type?
How did the pressure at the chamber vary by ammunition type?
Which is cheaper to use, after considering all the costs?[/url]
 
Join PNW Guns


Welcome to PNW Guns, a gun and firearm community for gun owners in the Pacific Northwest. We welcome everyone and the community is free to join so register today and become part of the PNW Guns family!


Old 01-08-2013, 11:45 AM   #2
Gunslinger
 
MadManx's Avatar
 
Joined: Jan 2009
From: Kirkland-Miami
Posts: 46
If I had these so called assault rifles, the steel wolf/wpa ammo would jam up all my AR's and my Valmet M76.
 
Old 01-08-2013, 12:23 PM   #3
Sniper
 
richardlpalmer's Avatar
 
Joined: Jan 2009
From: Kirkland, WA
Posts: 1,318
Good find!
 
Old 01-08-2013, 01:32 PM   #4
Moderator
 
sunofnun's Avatar
 
Joined: Jan 2009
From: s. greenlake bitch
Posts: 1,683
seems the evidence points to the same stories I've always heard.

The steel cases and different powder/pressure aren't super good for your guns.
 
Old 01-08-2013, 01:56 PM   #5
Rifleman
 
thejrod's Avatar
 
Joined: Jan 2009
From: Marysville, WA
Posts: 196
Interestingly, the cases themselves don't seem to be the largest part of the problem. It's the bullet. The barrel erosion was surprising to me.
 
Old 01-08-2013, 02:32 PM   #6
Moderator
 
sunofnun's Avatar
 
Joined: Jan 2009
From: s. greenlake bitch
Posts: 1,683
Quote:
Originally Posted by thejrod View Post
Interestingly, the cases themselves don't seem to be the largest part of the problem. It's the bullet. The barrel erosion was surprising to me.
HEYYYYYYYY jrod is alive.. whatup sukka.

Yeah, it sounds like a combo of the laquer coating, powder type and chamber pressure..
 
Old 01-08-2013, 03:08 PM   #7
Sharpshooter
 
GixxerPete's Avatar
 
Joined: Jan 2009
From: Renton, WA
Posts: 845
This is why I make all my cases out of gold. And bullets. With gold powder and primers too.

Auric Goldfinger.
 
Old 01-09-2013, 01:41 PM   #8
Sniper
 
richardlpalmer's Avatar
 
Joined: Jan 2009
From: Kirkland, WA
Posts: 1,318
Quote:
Originally Posted by sunofnun View Post
seems the evidence points to the same stories I've always heard.

The steel cases and different powder/pressure aren't super good for your guns.
I was surprised at how little the difference was. The lacquer did better than the polymer and the failure rate was pretty minor when looking at the number of rounds they went through. Ironic that the "dirtiest" was the brass -- the complete opposite of what I'd always been told...

But yeah, the affect of the bullet material on the barrel is what surprised me the most.

Quote:
Originally Posted by thejrod View Post
Interestingly, the cases themselves don't seem to be the largest part of the problem. It's the bullet. The barrel erosion was surprising to me.
It lives!
 
Old 02-14-2013, 12:50 PM   #9
Rifleman
 
KrautBurner's Avatar
 
Joined: Jan 2009
From: Bremerton, Wa
Posts: 185
I've never had a firearm that had any trouble with steel case ammo
(then again, I don't buy crap and expect it to be anything else)

a good gun, setup properly shouldn't mind the ammo

I typicly don't buy steel cased ammo because I reload (and the calibers I don't reload, I save my brass for people i know) and you can't reload the steel casings.
 
Reply

  PNW Guns > Gun Forum > Auto Rifles

Tags
223, 556, brass, fresh, steel, topic



Thread Tools
Display Modes



Facebook @pnwguns PNW Guns RSS Feed

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
SEO by vBSEO 3.6.0 ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.
Copyright 2009 - 2010 PNW Guns. All rights reserved.