PNW Guns Forum
Go Back   PNW Guns > PNW Guns > Gunsmithing

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 11-02-2011, 08:51 PM   #1
Gunslinger
 
vmkeith's Avatar
 
Joined: Jun 2011
From: Vancouver, Wa
Posts: 49
Winter Projects

Now that the rainy season has started here in Western Washington, and winter is right around the corner, I'm getting ready for some new projects. I plan on restoring a couple of guns I inherited from my grandfather...a J. Stevens 410 shotgun and a J. Stevens .22LR rifle. I know some people out there will say I'm running the risk of ruining the value, but to me, the value of these guns is passing them down to my kids for them to enjoy when I'm gone.

The first is my J. Stevens Single-shot Lever Action .22LR. Research for this has been easy with the markings showing it as a Model 94, which is also known as the "Old Stevens Favorite".








The J. Stevens 410 Single-shot Shotgun is a bit more puzzling. I haven't been able to find any specific info for which model shotgun I have. But I'm not going to give up.











*edit fixed your links ~josh

Last edited by sunofnun; 11-05-2011 at 07:11 AM.
 
Join PNW Guns


Welcome to PNW Guns, a gun and firearm community for gun owners in the Pacific Northwest. We welcome everyone and the community is free to join so register today and become part of the PNW Guns family!


Old 11-03-2011, 07:30 AM   #2
Marksman
 
Joined: May 2011
From: NW Quadrant WA State
Posts: 288
Quote:
Originally Posted by vmkeith View Post
The J. Stevens 410 Single-shot Shotgun is a bit more puzzling. I haven't been able to find any specific info for which model shotgun I have. But I'm not going to give up.
It looks like it is one of the "107" series.

J. Stevens was sold to Savage in 1920. They continued the line under the Stevens name until 1950.

Numrich has some diagrams and parts available here:Numrich

I don't know about "collector value" but I believe there were a lot of these shotguns made and sold. That in itself would limit the values.
 
Old 11-03-2011, 08:36 AM   #3
Gunslinger
 
Joined: Jun 2011
From: Everett, WA
Posts: 60
I have a similar model of the Stevens in 20 gauge.

I'd be very appreciative if you could share any info you do find.

I came up with little to no info as well.

Didn't see much on the previously mentioned site.

The breach on mine is stiff IMO. I did attempt to lubricate the pin but it did not alleviate the stiffness.

How am I supposed to be a bad ass and close the breach with one hand if the breach is stiff? :) It is tough with two hands at times.

Al
 
Old 11-03-2011, 02:21 PM   #4
Gunslinger
 
vmkeith's Avatar
 
Joined: Jun 2011
From: Vancouver, Wa
Posts: 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by deadshot2 View Post
It looks like it is one of the "107" series.

J. Stevens was sold to Savage in 1920. They continued the line under the Stevens name until 1950.

Numrich has some diagrams and parts available here:Numrich

I don't know about "collector value" but I believe there were a lot of these shotguns made and sold. That in itself would limit the values.
thanks for the info deadshot. So far the only thing I've found is this particular 410 seems to have been manufactured sometime between 1916 and 1940 based on the receiver markings...let the search continue.
 
Old 11-04-2011, 07:22 AM   #5
Marksman
 
Joined: May 2011
From: NW Quadrant WA State
Posts: 288
In your pictures it doesn't look like the receiver or barrel are badly pitted. This firearm may clean up real well and take a good polish/bluing job. If the bore is in good shape, keep it as a "shooter".
 
Old 11-04-2011, 11:23 AM   #6
Gunslinger
 
vmkeith's Avatar
 
Joined: Jun 2011
From: Vancouver, Wa
Posts: 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by deadshot2 View Post
In your pictures it doesn't look like the receiver or barrel are badly pitted. This firearm may clean up real well and take a good polish/bluing job. If the bore is in good shape, keep it as a "shooter".
On both the 410 and .22, neither receiver is pitted all that bad...mainly surface rust. The bores look good to, and just need a good cleaning. As for rust removal, I'm first going to degrease the hell out of them and then submerge them in some Evap-o-Rust and polishing if necessary. After all that, I'm not going to blue them, they will get parkarized and maybe gunkote...we'll see.
 
Old 11-06-2011, 04:18 AM   #7
Gunslinger
 
vmkeith's Avatar
 
Joined: Jun 2011
From: Vancouver, Wa
Posts: 49
Officially started with my first winter project...the J. Stevens .22LR restoration. I broke her down, cataloged my parts, and started on the buttstock and forearm restoration.

Buttstock and forearm-Pre cleanup


Buttstock and forearm-1st stage cleanup with Krud Killer cleaner/degreaser


Buttstock and forearm-2nd stage cleanup after a dishwasher cycle


The next step is to bring up the dents, scratches, and stains with damp wash clothes and an iron.
 
Old 11-14-2011, 12:32 AM   #8
Gunslinger
 
vmkeith's Avatar
 
Joined: Jun 2011
From: Vancouver, Wa
Posts: 49
Looks like I screwed up some of the pictures in this thread when I cleaned up my photobucket stuff...sorry, I'll add a few back so progress can be seem...not that I think anybody cares.

So just to recap, I'm restoring the J. Stevens Single-shot .22LR patent number APR 17 94 that my grandfather traded a set of spurs for back in 1938...he was 12 then. So far, the majority of the work has been the buttstock and forearm. I have disassembled the rifle as well, and started on the degreasing process of the smaller parts.

Buttstock & Forearm pre restoration


Buttstock & Forearm degreasing/stain removal. I used Krud Kutter and 0000 Steel Wool.


Buttstock & Forearm after 1st dishwasher cycle


Buttstock & Forearm after steaming (iron and wet wash clothes) and 2 more dishwasher cycles.


Since this is the original wood to the gun, I'm going to move on to sanding before I do anything else. I'm also going to redo the carving of my grandpa's initials...it just feels right to do. I would hate myself if I ruined the wood somehow trying to restore it. Besides, the few stains and dings add character...until next time.
 
Old 11-14-2011, 06:06 AM   #9
Marksman
 
Joined: May 2011
From: NW Quadrant WA State
Posts: 288
Have you tried anything like Ace Hardware's "Furniture Refinisher"? It's the same as "Homer Formby's" wood restoration product but about half the price.

These products are great for restoring wood like yours as they flush out all the dirt and old finish products without removing the natural oils from the wood.

When you're done I'd sure recommend some Birchwood Casey "Tru-Oil" for a finish. I finished a new stock for my 1903 Springfield using the old "One Coat a Day for a Month, One coat a week for another Month, and then one coat a year forever" method. The stock shines like glass and if I scratch the finish all I need to do is hit it with some 0000 steel wool and some more Tru-Oil.
 
Old 11-26-2011, 12:33 AM   #10
Gunslinger
 
vmkeith's Avatar
 
Joined: Jun 2011
From: Vancouver, Wa
Posts: 49
Finished up the stock and forearm restoration from my Steven's Favorite 1894.

Before pics



After pics



Total process:
Cleaning and degreasing
Dishwasher cycle
Steaming and another dishwasher cycle
Sanding with 60 through 320 grit sandpaper
3 coats of WATCO Teak Oil
Light sanding with 320 grit sandpaper
2 more coats of WATCO Teak Oil
 
Reply

  PNW Guns > PNW Guns > Gunsmithing

Tags
projects, winter



Thread Tools
Display Modes



Facebook @pnwguns PNW Guns RSS Feed

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
SEO by vBSEO 3.6.0 ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.
Copyright 2009 - 2010 PNW Guns. All rights reserved.